Category Archives: bookreview

LOAY Teaching Manual: The Master’s Amazing Teachings and Techniques Are Now Available for Everyone

By Jerome Burdi

Sri Dharma Mittra is always passing on knowledge from deep within the wells of his being. It may be hard to grasp, or to remember for some, or maybe some of the words to a mantra are elusive.

Since the recent publication of the Dharma Yoga Life of a Yogi Teacher’s Manual, all of these techniques that will put you on the fast track to Self-Realization are available at your fingertips. The beautiful book was set to motion by Sri Dharma’s wife and longtime disciple, Eva Grubler, aka Ismrittee Devi Om, with the help of Life of a Yogi teacher training director Adam Frei.

“There are no books without a true purpose,” Eva said. “The Life of a Yogi Teachers’ Manual is the condensed work, and a constant reminder of the teachings of beloved Yogi Sri Dharma Mittra. It is a book of devotion and love for the purity of these teachings as expressed by Sri Dharma for the past half century. And best: you can have it with you at all times!”

For two-and-a-half years, Adam had a series of meetings and conversations with Sri Dharma during which they slowly went over all of the basic material.

“It was an enormous privilege to have had the opportunity to edit the manual into its current form,” Adam said. “It was, for me, the experience of a lifetime.”

The deep information given during teacher trainings has been compiled in the book, along with old photos of Sri Dharma, charts he drew by hand, and a bunch of yogi recipes that will prepare the body to go to the higher levels of the practice.

I especially love all the mantras from the lineage spelled out and translated, and the breathing techniques. These have helped me as a teacher and student. It’s good to study and practice these properly while you’re on your own. Then when you practice with the master you can go much deeper with confidence.

There’s a breakdown of the main yogic texts and just about all things yoga. One of the things I love about Sri Dharma is he makes all this knowledge available to anyone who cares to seek it out: teacher trainees, students, or anyone else.

I can hear the words of the master when I read the text:

“It’s important to repeat difficult things at least three times. You’ll find that with each repetition, the difficulty lessens. Repeating something seven times is better than three times, while ten times is truly ideal. Always keep the laws of physics in mind, as they are so often the key to unlocking the physical aspect of the postures. Also, just open your eyes whenever you are in class and observe what’s going on around you. You can learn so much this way.”

Sri Dharma emphasizes the importance of personal practice. There’s also a section in the book on what practices to do, especially if you are one of the many people with limited time. For a man who is widely known for his stunning asana, Sri Dharma is always talking about how the poses are not important. Just the basic ones will give you what you need as you continue on your path to the higher limbs of concentration, meditation, and Self-Realization.

Sri Dharma: “Regarding the aspiring yogis who may read these words, I wish you all to be engaged in constant practice — this is the secret to making progress. Meditate on compassion, stay vegan and seek enlightenment. Be obedient to your teacher and reverent to all. Oh my loved ones, keep yama and niyama. Then, you will have a shortcut to immortality.”

“Lastly, I love you all. I am you and you are me.”

 

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist

Remarks on "The Shiva Samhita"

By Yama Om
 
The Shiva Samhita is a collection of verses of Shiva, which are in the form of a dialogue with Parvati.  The text contains the essence of Yoga as well as more esoteric teachings.  This post will briefly touch upon a few of the important themes of this text.
 
The Shiva Samhita claims to contain the “consummate” teaching of Yoga and therefore the aspirant need not concern him or herself with other sacred texts.[1]  The text succinctly teaches the laws of karma as, for example, in this verse: “Through the power of sin there is sorrow; through the power of good deeds, pleasure.  Therefore, one who desires pleasure must perform various types of good deeds” (7).  Heaven and hell are the results of good and evil deeds (6) but Heaven and hell are not forever because when the results of good and evil deeds are exhausted one is born again (7).
 
Karma is the cause of everything that appears and not just those things that appear pleasant or unpleasant, as stated in this verse: “Everything that is seen in the world results from karma.  A living being reaps rewards according to its karmas” (35).
 
It is through renunciation of both good and bad deeds, however, that the yogi begins to acquire the highest knowledge (8).  Says Shiva, “That which impels the workings of the mind into bad and good acts is me” (9).  The yogi understands him or herself to be the instrument of the higher Self or God.  As Sri Dharma teaches, “I am not the doer.”  Indeed, everything is God, as stated by Shiva, “nothing in this world is different from me” (9).
 
The highest knowledge of the nature of reality leads to liberation, as pointed out in the verse “suffering is destroyed through true knowledge, resulting in a happiness without beginning or end” (15).  The Self or God is this eternal knowledge which, when realized, destroys ignorance — the cause of the world — and the world itself.  Shiva says, “It is Maya [illusion] who is the mother of the universe.  She can be completely destroyed by one who knows the truth.  When she is destroyed, the universe no longer exists” (16).
 
Therefore, the importance of a guru to the aspirant on the path of Yoga cannot be stressed enough.  In the words of Shiva, “After finding a guru knowledgeable in Yoga and receiving instruction in Yoga, the yogi should carefully and resolutely practice in the way taught by the guru” (45).  Similarly, Sri Dharma teaches that “The role of Guru is of the highest importance, as is the sincerity, humility, and loyalty of the student” (The Importance of a Guru in Yoga Tradition).
 
There are precisely six marks of perfection in an aspirant which are enumerated in this text as follows: “The first mark of perfection is the conviction that one’s practice will bear fruit.  The second is having faith, the third is honoring one’s guru.  The fourth is equanimity, the fifth restraint of the sense organs, and the sixth curbing of the diet.  There is no seventh” (44).  Similarly, Sri Dharma teaches that “Diet is very important.”  Again, Shiva: “Until the practice is complete, the yogi should resort to a restricted diet.  Without doing so, the wise man is unable to carry out the practice in this life” (159).
 
Through the practice of meditation, the aspirant stills the mind of all activity and realizes wholeness, or absolute identity with the Self or God.  Shiva teaches that “Having made the mind free of fluctuations, the yogi automatically becomes complete” (155), and as a result, the yogi sees unity everywhere and is eventually liberated (156).


[1] The Shiva Samhita 5 (James Mallinson trans., YogaVidya.com 2007).  Please note that all parenthetical citations are to this edition.

Yama Om_Shiva SamhitaYama Om studied religion and philosophy for two decades at universities in the U.S. and in Europe.  He was blessed to have worked with some of the world’s great teachers, including the Dalai Lama and the Archbishop Desmond Tutu, whom he served as a teaching assistant.  Yama began studying yoga in 2002, but it was not until 2008, the same year he completed his Ph.D. in Religion, that he met his Guru, Sri Dharma Mittra.  Over the next five years, Yama completed the 200, 500, and 800 hour “Life of a Yogi” Teacher Training Programs.  As a public interest attorney, he works to prevent homelessness by providing free legal services to poor people facing eviction or foreclosure.

Self-Practice with B.K.S. Iyengar’s Light on Yoga

By Jessica Dodd

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My self-practice of yoga began in a small village made up of five families, tucked away in the historic Basque valley of Northern Spain. Using B.K.S. Iyengar’s book Light on Yoga as a guide, I rolled out my mat each day and practiced yoga. The room I stayed in had a beautiful bareness, located in a mere corner space of an old adobe building, with gorgeous blue frame windows that let in the light. Before practice each day I swept the floor which collected dust quickly. It was in this room that I developed the confidence to practice on my own.

Studying Light on Yoga played an important role in my development as a yogi. The text begins simply with “What is Yoga?”  As a recent college graduate who spent four years earning a bachelor’s of fine art in sculpture, this was the perfect introduction for me.  I had decided to change hats from learning and expressing myself through three-dimensional art to using my skills as a maker and give back more significantly to the world. I turned to small-scale organic farming, a respectable way of life that brings nourishment to the people. This journey of giving back and serving others led me to work on many parts of my being.

I had been traveling and volunteering on small family farms for a year when I arrived in that tiny town of Spain. I read through Iyengar’s opening words in Light on Yoga multiple times. I appreciated his straightforward writing which clearly illustrates the techniques, history, and path of yoga.

If it were not for his book, it may have been some time before I attempted to study the sacred science of yoga. Iyengar’s descriptive photographs were helpful to a beginner without a guru to learn from in person. He provides a thorough text describing the philosophy and practice of yoga that gives his readers a clear understanding well beyond a beginner level. I immediately began applying the Yamas (restraints) and Niyamas (observances) on and off the mat. These codes of conduct helped me to realize yoga was not just done on a mat or cushion, but rather the practice was with me always.

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With the book as my guide and my inner being as my greatest teacher, I practiced confidently on my own. Abhaya (non-fear) was a constant in my mind. I released any fear towards the practice of yoga. Instead I embraced it with the entirety of my being and learned to stay in the moment. Doing so helped me to consider the effects of my difficult childhood as cause for some of my personal traits as an adult. Once I learned to dislike only the actions done by persons of my life, rather than the persons themselves, I became free of ill feelings and full of forgiveness.

Iyengar’s fourfold remedy to overcome common obstacles, which were drawn from the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, were also at the forefront of my thoughts. Maitri (friendliness) taught me to connect more easily with new people I met when I traveled. Karuna (compassion) was the backbone of my decision to work only for room and board on each small family farm as most farmers have very little money. Mudita (delight) enveloped me as I admired each farmer for their talents and the beautiful bounties they produced for their communities. Upeksa (disregard) helped me through challenges with other persons, reminding me to first look within myself.

Light on Yoga is a sacred book in my collection. Though I do not practice a classical Iyengar style of yoga today, I believe this book helped me develop a strong foundation for my practice. Learning to manage fiery dedication, honoring the light within, and being light at heart takes courage. Today I have that courage and I look forward to sharing it with others within the Dharma Yoga community and beyond.

Jessica_DoddJessica Dodd is a craftswoman living in the mountains of Western North Carolina.  She founded and runs a sustainable textile business that focuses on organic linens naturally dyed with plants.  Her yoga practice is present in all threads of her life.  She enjoys living a simple homestead lifestyle, getting her hands dirty tending the soils, and preparing meals for others.  She participated in the Dharma Yoga LOAY Teacher Training in February 2014.

The Power of Thoughts

By Dawn Kopecki

The book Yoga and Yogic Powers by Yogi Gupta was a revelation when I first read it more than two years ago. It completely transformed how I think about yoga, what I knew at the time about yoga, and how I have approached my yogic studies since then. It is, by far, one of my favorite books on yoga.

“There is a close association between a material thing and your invisible thoughts,” Yogi Gupta writes at the beginning of the chapter “Thoughts are Things.” That idea was one of the strongest messages I took away from reading this book.

Our thoughts are basically electrical currents or vibrations that are carried throughout the universe and can physically impact, even manifest, other people’s thoughts as well as physical matter.

This is a really important concept to understand in yoga, since we are ultimately trying to master control over our thoughts. Negative thoughts translate into negative energy, and increase the likelihood of negative events. Positive thoughts attract more positive energy to your aura, and increase the odds of a good outcome on whatever it is that you’re focusing on.

A person’s thoughts have a direct impact on a person’s mood and physical health. All the cells in the body are under direct control of your higher mind, not your conscious mind. Your higher mind, which never sleeps, literally controls all mechanical and electrical functions in the body; therefore, it can heal disease. However, negative thoughts can affect your higher mind and, in turn, your physical body in negative ways. Yogis are able to gain control of their higher minds and to access or control the forces of nature, which is also known as supernatural phenomena.

“Every action, physical or mental in your life, is preceded by a specific thought in your mind and that thought is preceded by specific astral pictures or astral images.”

The astral image may be your own or someone else’s. People who have don’t have strong protection around their auras are more prone to receive negative thoughts or psychic attacks. You can psychically “charge” yourself and protect yourself against attack by generating more prana and strengthening your aura. A yogi shouldn’t attempt to heal herself until she has mastered the ability to protect her aura and strengthen her prana.

Every single thought is its own form comprised of energetic vibrations that are transmitted and picked up by other human beings. Those thoughts and currents can also manifest themselves in forms of disease or health and, among the extremely evolved yogis, can take physical shape.

Every thought we have in our earthly bodies is stored in our astral bodies for the afterlife. Those thoughts and actions form our Karma, which helps determine the course in our next lifetime.

 

Dawn_KopeckiDawn has had a consistent yoga practice since 2006 and completed her first 200-Hour Teacher Training in 2009 in Washington, D.C. She found her real calling when she stumbled upon the Dharma Yoga Center‘s website that year and moved to New York in 2010 for a new job and to train at the DYC. She completed the LOAY 200-Hour Teacher Training with Sri Dharma Mittra in 2011 and the LOAY 500-Hour Teacher Training in 2012. She’s also certified to teach children’s yoga and has trained with the Lineage Project, which teaches yoga to incarcerated teens in New York City, hoping to eventually bring Sri Dharma Mittra’s teachings to people who can’t afford classes. Yoga has not only transformed her body, strength and overall health, but it brings a sense of balance and calm to her high-stress job covering finance and politics in New York and Washington, D.C.

Why read the Dhammapada?

by Fay Inger
 
©Enid Johnstone
 
When reading through the Dhammapada, I found that many verses resonated with me and I wonder if this is because I read the verses with yogi colored glasses because I studied with Sri Dharma Mittra
 
When a modern day Guru such as Sri Dharma recommends a book, it makes it less obscure and more approachable. Certainly, many verses touched upon themes I learned in the Life of a Yogi (LOAY) Teacher Training program, and when reading, I imagined seeing Sri Dharma’s face with a glimmer in his eye! 
 
Because of the similarities between the words of the Buddha and Sri Dharma, it is no wonder that Sri Dharma recommends this text as an important read for any new or experienced yogi. 

 
There is a misconception that you must be a Buddhist or a person on a spiritual path seeking enlightenment to study the texts. In reality, this text is an important read regardless of one’s religious affiliation, because it transcends religion. In fact, there is no mention of religion at all. The book is not about religion or a higher power; it is about empowering the reader to be his or her best possible version by realizing that all the power is already within. (As I type this, I am aware of the strong correlation with how Sri Dharma encourages students to find their inner Guru). 

 
Jack Kornfield, who wrote the foreword of the Gil Fronsdal translation of the Dhammapada, himself touches upon this very concept in the introduction, where he points out the contrast between the opening verse in the bible and the opening verses in the Dhammapada. As the author points out, the bible “emphasize God’s role as creator and, by extension, our reliance on God’s power.” This implies that we are weak in God’s shadow. Conversely, the Dammapada reflects “the importance and effectiveness of a person’s own actions and choices.” This observation highlights how we are in charge of our own path and indeed, the masters of our own destinies. The entirety of the text is reminding us of this fact in every capacity and function. 

 
As the Buddha points out in the very first verse, it is our minds. “All experience is preceded by mind, led by mind, made by mind.” This sentiment reflects that Sri Dharma taught us that it is not we who are “bad,” it is our minds. It’s an important distinction, as it allows the individual freedom from our own thoughts and therefore actions – not to shirk responsibility of our deeds, but rather as a way to reflect on our own thoughts and regulate them before they turn into actions. 

 
According to the Buddha, our very experiences start with the mind! Is it any wonder, then, that when going into a situation thinking it will be bad, it usually is? To tie this into asana: if, before attempting a posture, the thought is, “there’s no way I can do that,” you are right and it will indeed be impossible to do.  Sri Dharma, in his infinite wisdom has said, “If you can bend your mind, you can bend your body.”  How liberating then to take ownership over your own experiences! 

 

 
The verse that I believe sums up the blueprint to living the life of a yogi is found in Chapter two, verse 25: “Through effort, vigilance, restraint and self control, the wise person can become an island no flood will overwhelm.” This is a powerful lesson to heed, as it sums up so much of Sri Dharma’s teachings. The Yamas and Niyamas, making an effort in asana — regardless of what happens around you, inside you are unchanged. This is essentially the same lesson from the Buddha to Sri Dharma just in different words! This concept is again reflected in Chapter 3 verse 38: “For those who are unsteady of mind, who do not know true Dharma, and whose serenity wavers, wisdom does not mature.” In essence, if you want to be wise, the reader is given the exact route to take to achieve wisdom.  It is through steadying the mind, finding your Dharma and becoming serene. And the ultimate goal is to conquer oneself. 
 
According to the Buddha: “Greater in combat than a person who conquers a thousand times a thousand people is the person who conquers herself.” 

 
And if one is simple and does not wish to be wise or to conquer him/her self? The Buddha has a blueprint for this person as well: “Doing no evil, engaging in what’s skillful, and purifying one’s mind: This is the teaching of the buddhas.” 

 
I find this book to be a perfect companion to Sri Dharma’s teachings for a student like myself who is across the country from the center, or for a student who has never participated in a LOAY teacher training. While the words are different, the direction and ultimate goal is the same. If it is mastery of the self one is seeking, then the Dhammapada is a text that will help set one on the right path. 

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Fay Inger is a 800-Hour Certified Dharma Yoga instructor living in Los Angeles, California. Fay is a private yoga instructor, writes blog posts on yoga and wellness and is learning nutrition to better help her students reach their health and fitness goals. As she always says, “yoga is a gift” and it is her favorite gift to share!

 

"Must Read" Book Review ~ Asanas: 608 Yoga Poses by Sri Dharma Mittra

Review by Leslie Holden 

Asanas: 608 Yoga Poses was lovingly made in devotion by Sri Dharma Mittra. Written in a divinely inspired state, Asanas imparts on the reader a sacred science from an experienced teacher. This small yet powerful book depicts a lifetime of knowledge through photos of asana, and can be put into the hands of any aspirant.  In fact, many of those that have found their way to Sri Dharma Mittra state that it was this book that inspired them to find him. Without over-complication, the entire text forms the foundation of yoga and it will move and inspire in the deepest of ways.

       
The Dedication page at the beginning of the book displays profound examples of Dharma Mittra the Karma Yogi and perfected teacher. It is shown through his virtue of leading by example rather than through lecture and further displayed through his devotion, practicing non-attachment and the offering of each action to the Almighty one.
As Sri Dharma says, “Rest your mind on Him alone,” and indeed, each time I read the opening prayer I am sent into feelings of Bhakti and reverence. If one never made it past this point in the book one may still have a clear understanding of the goal of Yoga: knowledge of the true Self.

The chapter “guidelines for practice” is concise and appropriate for the modern Yogi. Anyone who has read the Hatha Yoga Pradipika will have experienced the need for an update to the lifestyle of a Yogi in the West and this chapter allows all aspirants to implement the simple ideas into their home practice with maximum results. And above all, we are asked to keep in mind “to be nice to all.”
Sri Dharma’s introduction is a clear and experiential account of the path of a sincere Yogi told in a loving way.  We are reminded that asana, the physical poses, are only one part of an eight-stage process in the search for enlightenment. The principle of meditation is incorporated in this section, thus offering a gentle invitation to follow the thread and find the ultimate goal. Additionally, the ethical rules are simply and clearly explained.  
Sri Dharma Mittra comments on the need for a Guru because it is “someone who has gone the route,” but even the student with no access to a teacher will find the tools in this book to evolve his/her practice. Then, as Sri Dharmaji says, “mysteriously things all fall into place!”
This book truly is an amazing offering and an amazing feat! To even attempt to comprehend the state that these photos were taken in will lead to a feeling of Bliss! 
Sri Dharma Mittra adds a sprinkling of information about each pose along the way, reminding us in the same quiet way that he teaches that it is up to the student to copy the teacher. With the absence of ego, Dharma offers this perfected collection of information and asana variations that are absolutely humbling to look at and majestic to take in.  
To see more of the beautiful asanas featured in this book, check out DYNYC’s online library
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Leslie (Surya Om) Holden has completed the Dharma Yoga “Life of a Yogi” 200 Hour Teacher Training and is in the Internship phase of her 500 Hour Teacher Training. Raised in British Columbia, Leslie began yoga as a centering and strengthening practice to help her as a professional equestrian. She had her first encounter with Sri Dharma Mittra while living in Hawaii in 2006. Immediately knowing she had found her teacher, she began to dedicate herself to the practice while living in British Columbia studying Holistic Nutrition and attending college for Chartered Herbalism. She finished school and relocated with her husband, a native New Yorker, to New York to continue full time studies under Sri Dharma Mittra. She now teaches Dharma Yoga on Long Island. “Sri Dharma has guided me to realize my fullest potential, I have been transformed by this practice. My highest joy is to share this practice with others.”