Category Archives: poses

Tapas for Teachers

By Liz Schindler

“Yoga is the path of purification of character and conduct (the cleansing of one’s physical and mental nature) wherein the highest state of reality and truth may shine undiminished in the hearts and minds of all beings.” –Sri Dharma Mittra
 
©Jeffrey Vock

 My Life of A Yogi Teacher Training Training wasn’t all rainbows and kittens! Well, it was mostlyrainbows and kittens, but also a whole lot of tapas. Tapas is perhaps the most transformative of the niyamas, or personal disciplines, set forth by Patanjali in The Yoga Sutras as well as the basis for the “path to purification” that Sri Dharma Mittra refers to in his definition of yoga.
According to the LOAY manual, tapas is defined as heat, austerity, or burning away impurities through self-discipline.Tapas was at the beginning of my transformative journey and it fueled my passion to learn and grow and to push through self doubt. Tapas caused the deepening of my physical practice throughout the intensive ten days, fueled by my own fire and sweat. It was tapas that drove me to the training, got me through it, and forced a change in my body, mind and spirit.
       
Sri Dharma Mittra is referred to as the teacher’s teacher and for good reason! Sri Dharma is the perfect shepherd to the trainees because he didn’t only show us how to teach yoga classes, he shared his limitless experience, knowledge and wisdom.  The morning pranayama and spiritual discourse sessions were the highlight of my day and I cannot stress how challenging but rewarding the breath work was. I soaked up all the information on the kriyas, mantra, chakras, bandhas and mudras.  
©Jeffrey Vock
 
Yet there was still the element of tapas and the floor seemed to harden with each passing day and by day six easy poses were no longer easy. The pain of sitting with a tall spine (out of respect for Sri Dharma) was distracting at times but looking back I’m happy that I did it. It broke a mental barrier in my mind and got rid of “I can’t do this any longer” and replaced it with “I’m still doing this.” I read a quote somewhere that says “your mind will always give up before your body, just keep going” and I did.
The hard part was putting myself out there as a teacher and I cannot adequately express my horror as I taught my first Dharma I class to my group during the training. In contrast to my inexperience, my group was so advanced! Two of my group-mates had mothers that taught yoga and two others were already certified teachers. This was my first teaching experience ever and I was mortified. I remember my disappointment as I taught and how frustrated I was over the shakiness in my voice and the inaccuracy of my cues. But why was I so nervous? I had been falling on my sweaty face and loudly farting in front of these people for days! But suddenly their opinion mattered more than anything and I thought I was bombing it.


©Liz Schindler
 
After finishing my first practice teach (which felt like hours) my mentor Hannah Allerdice gave me an honest review of my teaching. She stressed her opinion that I would be a wonderful teacher because she could sense how much I cared about my students. At the time I thought she was just being kind, but looking back through my handy 20/20 hindsight goggles, I see she was on point. Because I care so much I was nervous and horrified while practice teaching. My drive to teach yoga stems from my gratefulness to all of my teachers for helping deepen my yoga practice and to open my heart. All I wanted then and now is to be able to share that same gift of yoga with my students.
       
By the end of the training I had more confidence in my teaching and a greater sense of sympathy for my own feelings. I made strong friendships and have new role models to look up to. I surpassed my own expectations and in turn have raised my self-expectations. The LOAY teacher training experience was truly life altering for me and I am forever grateful to Sri Dharma and all of his teaching staff. 

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Liz Schindler found yoga during a stressful period of her life and has returned to it again and again for over ten years to calm both body and mind. After moving to New York and beginning to study with Sri Dharma Mittra, she soon came to realize her need to share her love of yoga with others. Liz is a 200-Hour Certified Dharma Yoga Teacher. She currently lives and teaches in Brooklyn, NY.

 

    

      

Fierce Devotion: Hanumanasana

by Sara Schwartz

“Inhabit the consciousness of the pose,” Sri Dharma Mittra instructs. With fun names like Eagle Pose, and Lizard pose you feel like you’re five years old again.



So what’s the deal with the splits? Hanumanasa, front to back splits, is a posture to remind you that you are not five years old anymore! This pose is possible though – you just have to inhabite the consciousness of its patron: Hanuman, the most loyal of the Gods. 


Hanuman is the son of a monkey and the wind –part earthly, part divine and the king of the monkeys in Hindu mythology. Hanuman loved Rama from the moment he saw him, and pledged his loyalty to him. When Rama’s wife Sita was kidnapped by an evil demon, Hanuman came to the rescue. He took a great giant leap from India’s south-east coast to Sri Lanka to save her.  Hanuman’s fierce devotion helped him to do the impossible. 

The lesson of Hanuman: Skill arises from devotion.



How to practice Hanumanasana:
Before attempting the splits, do a few rounds of Dharma Yoga style Sun Salutations to warm up.

Then:

·        from forward fold, step your right foot back;

·        Bring your right knee to the floor and walk your hands by your hips;

·        Flex your left toes towards your face, heel is on the mat;

·        Make sure your right knee is underneath your right ankle, right toes tucked under;

·        Begin to lean forward over your left leg. You don’t want the back of your left leg to feel like a guitar string about to break;
·        Here is where the fidelity comes in. No matter what your pose looks like – hold the pose and send your breath or intention to the tight and tender places;

If you start to feel more relaxed, and the stretch goes away, begin to slide your heel forward. If your pelvis touches the floor, or you feel stable, begin to sweep your arms overhead into a prayer position and gaze up at your hands. Your hands send the message from your heart to the heavens.




·        To exit the pose, push yourself up off the floor with your hands.

·        If you can come into the low lunge, equestrian pose.

·        Step back into plank pose, lower knees, chest, and chin to the mat.

·        Come up for cobra, press back downward facing dog.

·        Jump your feet to your hands, and then step back with your left foot to repeat Hanumanasa. 



The amount of sensation in your legs is a reminder of how the faithful Hanuman felt in the name of the King that he honored and served.


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Sara Schwartz lives in Queens, New York with her husband Yancy. She currently teaches at Yoga to the People, where she received her 200-hour certification in 2010. She recently graduated from the Dharma Yoga Center Life of a Yogi 500-Hour Teacher Training. “Offer up the fruits of your practice” is her favorite advice from Sri Dharma Mittra. She is very grateful for the guidance of Sri Dharma and all of his teachers.

Six Ways to Get the Most Out of Your LOAY Teacher Training

By Jennifer Helgren

©Jeffrey Vock

First and foremost: GO



“Always do what you are afraid to do”   –Ralph Waldo Emerson



When the thought of attending the 500-Hour Life of a Yogi Teacher Training first entered my mind, I almost automatically dismissed the idea.  I had so many reasons NOT to attend (mother of two young children, travelling husband, a plane ride away from NYC, no housing in the city, etc.)



What I learned was that when I committed to my dream, the obstacles fell away. It may take some time, and definitely some effort, but the result – well, is simply too great to put into mere words. Dive in, take a chance, and find a way to GO.

Second:  Open your mind and heart



“Be Receptive” —Sri Dharma Mittra



There will be moments in the training that will challenge you – physically, mentally, spiritually – and you must always remember that is why you are here. Open the whole of your mind, even the places that you are least aware of: the places that hold onto resistance.  Allow the words, people, experiences, and lessons to pour into those hidden places. Listen with an open heart and mind, and the information will be absorbed.  Weeks, months after you leave, you will hear these words and learn these lessons…they will reside in the mind and heart, and the space you created within. 



©Jeffrey Vock
Third: Put forth effort and use imagination



“Imagination is powerful. You go as far as you can imagine”– Sri Dharma Mittra



You are going to be tired at some point. You will physically and mentally hit the proverbial wall.  You will move past it. I promise you, a second wind comes along and you will be renewed.



I second-guessed myself initially, but that fell away after time. My mind let go of the attachments to thoughts and emotions that often distract us and inhibit us from fully committing to something.  We live in the real world, and the world does not like to be left behind. It will pull at you, distract you, and sometimes overwhelm you.  Give yourself time to allow these things to come up. They are natural and they will pass.



Apply disciplined effort to your practice. Let the physical practice act as a brush to scrub away at whatever negative tendencies you may have.  Let it invigorate you, regenerate you. Your physical practice will grow by leaps and bounds through dedication and practice, practice, practice.



Finally, use your imagination – Sri Dharma talks about this often and it truly resonated with me. Imagine yourself to be a better person, mother, father, daughter, son, friend, partner – a better yogi. Use your imagination as fuel to show yourself that what you pursue is attainable through effort, dedication, study, and time. 

Fourth: Be a Student



“In learning you will teach and in teaching, you will learn” Phil Collins



Lose all preconceptions. Take off the teacher hat and allow yourself to commit to being a student. Listen and learn: from Sri Dharma, the mentors, your fellow trainees. Watch your own mind and learn how to apply all that you receive to yourself, your life, your teaching.  Apply the lessons to every aspect of your life. You will be amazed at how the things you are exposed to relate to your roles in life – as a person, yogi, teacher, parent, child, friend, partner, spouse. This is truly the LIFE of a yogi training!



Listen as much as possible. You will want to take notes, but if you can, take time to just be still and listen. Let go and simply absorb the information and the words.  Listen to other people’s questions and answers and try not to be too eager to answer them for yourself, even in your own mind. Let other people share, and let their knowledge and experiences become part of your own.

©Jeffrey Vock


Fifth: Smile, live, learn, laugh…and do your homework!



“Knowledge is a treasure, but practice is the key to it” Lao Tzu



Enjoy the training! Every day, it becomes more of a part of you and integrates itself into your very being. 

Sri Dharma is always quick with a smile and a kind-hearted joke. He understands the power of laughter and the importance of joy.  The training will go faster than you think, so soak up every minute! When you leave between sessions or after the final interval, do your homework!  Remember that you are going to be able to do it and what’s more, you will enjoy it. After my internship ended, I found that much of the homework has become a part of my daily life.  After talking with many other trainees, this is the case with most of us.  Carry it forward. Apply it. LIVE it. 

Sixth and finally: Go back



“Well, sometimes home is a person” –B.Revis



I understand how hard to is to travel to New York City. Still, I would encourage you to go back as much as you can. Go home, and by home I mean return to Sri Dharma and be in his presence. 



However, if you are very far and it is not possible for you to physically go, keep in touch with people through the internet, the phone, however you can to maintain the connection. I have found myself using Facebook to keep in contact with other trainees and to touch base with the Center – daily! You can see pictures of Sri Dharma, the mentors, your friends. You can read quotes from Sri Dharma (and yes, you hear his voice!) You see familiar faces and smiles and all at once, you are home. 



In closing, ultimately this experience is a very personal one. I wish that everyone who is undecided about going could understand one thing – you will never regret going, but you may regret having never been. 


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Jennifer has a undergraduate degree in Psychology and a Master’s Degree with a specialty in Counseling.  She had a career as a counselor working with clients of all ages and backgrounds, in varying environments, with a wide range of needs and concerns.  After her time as a counselor, Jennifer began her life as a mother, the most rewarding and challenging career of all. She believes that her education, practice, and history as a counselor, and mother, play an important role in her yoga practice and her teaching. She believes strongly that a truly dedicated spiritual and physical yoga practice can transform, enhance, and expand the life of the practitioner. Jennifer had the honor to study with Sri Dharma Mittra for both the LOAY 200- and 500-Hour Teacher Trainings, and recently graduated from the 500-hour Life of a Yogi Teacher Training. Jennifer studied with numerous other teachers, but continues to find her strength, inspiration, knowledge, direction, and guidance from Sri Dharma. She lives in Virginia Beach, Virginia with her husband and two children.  Jennifer teaches regular weekly classes in Virginia Beach and continues to travel to NYC at every available opportunity to study under Sri Dharma and the Senior Teachers at the NYC Center. 

Contentment – Discovered in a Bad Yoga Class

by Melody Abella

“By contentment, supreme joy is gained.”  sutra 2.42

Santosha is the Sanskrit word for contentment.  It’s first mentioned in The Yoga Sutras among the list of five niyamas. 
·        Side note:  My take on the niyamas is they guide our internal compass.  They’re ethical principles (or observances) that strengthen our character and guide us to live life in the best, most purest way possible.  As a result, they help us shine in a way that inspires others to live richer lives.  Richer meaning all the wealth we truly need is deep within, and not found held in a bank account.


©Jeffrey Vock
Back to santosha/contentment:

In my yoga studies, I’ve seen many deep definitions on contentment.  From a simple idea like contentment is being able to appreciate and live in the present moment to a more thought-provoking description of “Contentment is perfected in the absence of cravings.  It is the experience that nothing is lacking, that everything happens is an integral part of a Divine Plan.” (Inside the Yoga Sutras by Jaganath Carrera)

It’s often said that we already have everything we need.  Or as Sri Dharma Mittra says “all is within.” 

Our culture wants us to believe we need “things” or other people to make us happy.  The “things” list is long but a few examples:  new toys (cars, bikes, clothes, accessories), fancy restaurants, botox, a different boyfriend/husband/family.  You get the drift. 


The path of yoga leads us in the opposite direction…let go of external desires and internal contentment will be discovered.  The process of discovering contentment requires a huge mound of trust, courage and attention though. 


©Jeffrey Vock
It takes a lot of trustto follow a notion, such as the niyama contentment, when no one is there to hold your hand and lead you through the dark moments of life.  It also takes a lot of courage to fully step in and feel life as it is happening – feeling the awesome, okay, bad, scary and all the sensations in between that show up.  It takes a lot of payingattention to the present experience – being in it, as it is and not mentally jumping ahead to what’s happening 5 hours later the day.
Total confession here…I took a not so great yoga class recently in DC and it was there that I experienced santosha in a new way. 

So I signed up for what was listed as a vinyasa yoga /intermediate level class.  Let’s just say after starting in a restorative pose for ten plus minutes and not getting into my first Downward Facing Dog until twenty minutes into class, I was not content…

Thanks to my Grandmother’s constant words of wisdom, I reminded myself that there is always something new to learn in every situation in life.  Though I continued to find myself way too often checking the clock, realizing I had no idea the end time for the class and feeling I was stuck there.  Then I thought “I’m stuck here for a reason”.  That’s when I settled in and tried to make the best of it.


I can’t say I learned anything “new” from the teacher but I had a total realization that my life could be way worse.  Here I was on a Sunday morning surrounded by 40 or so others in a yoga class, bending and stretching in ways that many people aren’t able to do.  I have a healthy body and a great life.  The sun was coming out and I had a full day off ahead.  Life could be so much worse.  It was there and then I reminded myself of santosha.

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Passionate about sharing the power of yoga & its transformational benefits, Melody Abella founded a mobile yoga business in 2006. abellaYoga travels to corporate and private clients in Washington, D.C., Alexandria and Arlington, VA to teach yoga in homes, offices, hotels, and conference centers. Grateful for experiences gained in the telecom/tech corporate world, this ex-marketing yoga-chick is happy to share all she knows about yoga. Believing through discipline and devotion we have the power within to make positive changes in our bodies, lives and this world, Melody teaches her students “anything is possible”. Or as Sri Dharma Mittra says you must have “angry determination.” Melody received her 500-hour Dharma Yoga Teacher certification in May 2012. She continues to hop the train from DC to NYC monthly to practice with Sri Dharma Mittra at the Dharma Yoga New York Center.



When Yoga and Technology Meet

by Deanna Aliano

©Jeffrey Vock

As I sit here, checking my email on my computer, responding to a Facebook post on my phone and listening to music on my iPod, I am reminded of how much life has changed over the past decade. 

It wasn’t that long ago that most people didn’t have cell phones or iPods, and I can still remember when the Internet was the new big thing. Social networking hadn’t even occurred to anyone and we actually had to use a CD Rom of an encyclopedia for research.

Times change and the way we do things has to change, too. How does all this change and advancement affect our ancient practice of yoga? I guess it depends on your perspective.  

The internet, with all its social media sites and continuous distractions, has been touted by many as the evil downfall of society. It’s easy to get lost in the overwhelming sea of information and chatter. Marriages have ended, new ways of bullying have developed and many people have been coaxed online to do things they normally wouldn’t do in public, all while spending time on the Internet. 

But, with all its negatives, there have been many positives. Just as bad information is out there, so is good:

· You can go online at any time and find articles on yoga, both spiritual and physical.

· You can research religious ideas such as Hinduism or Buddhism, finding out why most practitioners choose not to eat meat or how they go about their meditation practices.

· You can research veganism and find a plethora of recipes and articles on the best ways to go about it.

· You can even find support on your spiritual or health-related paths, and friends to chat with and commiserate with when your journey goes through a difficult patch.

· There are movies to watch at the click of the button, showing you how others have managed on their paths.

· There are book reviews, podcasts and radio shows about every aspect of yoga imaginable.

· You can even find online online video practices with Sri Dharma Mittra himself!



For some, afraid to venture into a yoga classroom because they can’t yet touch their toes, this provides a safe way to start practicing. 
On Twitter and Facebook, there are multitudes of people spreading positive words and photos reminding you why yoga is so wonderful. Many people post photos of yoga poses, which leads to inspiration for many yogis, like me, to get to the mat.

Most yoga studios now have websites, Facebook, and Twitter accounts that you can follow to be reminded of upcoming classes, events and even just to spread the word of some wonderful things taking place in the studio. It builds a sense of community so you still feel like part of it, even when you can’t make it to class.  

It’s really not just the Internet that makes technology a positive development for yoga. Most yoga teachers use an iPod to play the background music for their classes; many often finding new music to introduce to students, furthering the artistic endeavors of their favorite performers and adding variety to their classes. Some teachers may keep class notes on their iPad so they can remember to share all the information in a lecture, or perhaps a reading they thought particularly useful to the class.

I’ve recently stumbled across a meditation app that has proved quite useful. The app has a timer that can be easily set to go off only at the end of your session or at intervals during your practice. I’ve used it on my own and in classes, instructing to practice pranayama until the first gong, followed by meditation after that.  
Of course, there are downfalls to technology. I have witnessed students bringing their phones into class, hoping to check their email in the middle of a vinyasa flow. It happens so often that I often wonder if there is a Phonecheckasana… It’s a distraction, which is something yoga is supposed to help us stay away from.

One positive thing about the technological distractions is that there is more of a need for people to find a physical place to connect… to belong. I believe this is why many yoga studios are enjoying increased class sizes and repeat business. People crave that place where they can feel comfortable in their own skin again, where they feel respected by themselves and others, free from judgment. 
All in all, yoga may benefit greatly from the changes in technology as long as the practitioners can find a way to keep it from becoming a constant distraction from their practice. With the help of all the yogis out there trying to spread the joys of yoga, I’m sure it will be a wonderful thing!

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Deanna has been exposed to many different styles of yoga and has recently taken the Dharma Yoga Life of a Yogi Teacher Training with Sri Dharma Mittra in New York City. Being a certified Pilates instructor, massage therapist, and fitness trainer, Deanna never thought she would find her higher self in a “fitness” class, but she did and has never looked back. She has developed Artasana workshops, exploring creativity through the art of yoga. She spends her time off the mat writing, illustrating yogis and enjoying her children at the New Jersey Shore.

Five Ways To Detox Your Thoughts

by Sorsha Anderson

Most of us have an idea how to detox our bodies:  eating right, exercising and juicing or fasting.  But how do we detoxify our thoughts and thought process?  In much the same way: by choosing which thoughts to feast on and which to pass up.

Think of your mind as a giant store that is stocked with unlimited food.  Further realize that this store is stocked in part by the world outside which is filled with unhealthy influences.  No matter what our intentions, our store is not always the health food store we would like it to be.  The good news is that no matter what state our store is in, we can examine carefully each item that we take off of the shelf and choose whether or not to put it into our cart.

Try the steps below:


  • Understand that you are not your thoughts. 

Just as the food in your cart may belong to you, it is not you. The same is true with thought.  Thoughts are a product of the mind, the mind is a tool of the self, but it is not the self.  As Sri Dharma Mittra explains, “the mind is powerful, it loves its pleasure. It will throw you down! But you are not the mind.”   

He continues with this analogy:  the higher self resting in the body is akin to a driver in a car.  If you are driving the car and the brakes fail and you are having trouble with the electrical system, you are having trouble with the car, but you are not the car.  Next: 



©Jeffrey Vock

  • Observe your thoughts

This can be done very simply in a short period of time.  Pick a quiet time during the day, or even as you lay down before sleep at night.  Close your eyes and observe the thoughts that come into your mind.  Do not engage the thoughts, do not dialogue with the thought or practice arguments in your head…just watch the thoughts come up and then let them go.  Even five minutes at a time will help introduce you to your thought patterns and begin to give you the sense of the ‘observer,’ your higher self watching the thoughts.  It will give you an excellent idea of what shape your store is in.  Is it a health food store or a 7-eleven?

  • Don’t fear your thoughts.

Even if after some observation you notice negative patterns, keep calm.   Everyone experiences negative thoughts.  You cannot help the thoughts that float through your mind.  Remember, they are thoughts only and they are not you.  You can begin to control your thoughts by using your discrimination.  You do not have to validate every thought that comes into your mind any more than you have to buy unhealthy food every time you enter the store.  If a troublesome or unhelpful thought arises, ask first, “Is this thought compassionate? Is it compassionate to myself, to my friends, to the world?”  If it is, engage the thought and let it tell its story.  If not then let it go; leave it on the shelf.  Leave room in the mind for something worthy.  As Sri Dharma Mittra says, “Cultivate compassion, the rest will come.”

  • Strike a pose!

Try tree pose, with the eyes closed. No matter how observant and vigilant we become, all of us have trouble at times releasing negative thoughts. If the mind is stuck in a difficult place, give it something else to concentrate on.  Vrksasana, can be done almost anywhere, any corner of any room, even a bathroom stall at work.  Stand in tree, feel your standing foot on the ground and close your eyes.  Tell your mind, ‘Nothing changes here; I am simply lowering my eyelids.’  The mind may fight; it may panic as the eyes close and it loses the visual horizon; but remember, you are the driver.  Use the breath, feel yourself in space; imagine you are simply a tree in the dark.  The mind will start to understand that it does in fact know where it is in space without visual reassurance.  It will begin to settle. The worrisome detail the mind would not relinquish may suddenly dissolve in the moonlight!



©DovVargas

  • Count to ten – upside down.

In addition to the physical benefits of inverting the body, the mind greatly benefits as well.  One of the elements of inversions that hooked me early on was the instantaneous quieting of the mind.  If the mind won’t stop, if it becomes filled with obsessive thoughts and won’t let go, dump it out!  Turn your cart upside down, empty it out and start again.  The mind will begin to concentrate on not falling over and start to let go of everything else.  Something about going upside down is also reminiscent of being a kid again.  We physically recall a time when we felt fearless and invincible and our mood instantly elevates. 

You are not your thoughts, but thoughts are energy and the vibration of that energy affects our mood, our state of being and our physical body.  Next time you are revamping your diet because the body is calling out for a change, also take stock of the contents of the mind.  Choose to leave those uncompassionate, un-helpful thoughts on the shelf, and over time, your store may stop stocking them altogether.


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Sorsha lives and teaches in Vermont.  She has been practicing since 1991 and worked with very gentle and restorative yoga until her 30’s when she wandered into a hot and sweaty, but meditative vinyasa studio.  Neither a dancer nor gymnast as a child, and after having had two children, she surprised herself by balancing in crow for the first time at 36.  She never looked back.  Sorsha approaches each new pose with a sense of optimism and adventure and delights in encouraging others to try what only seems impossible at first glance.  She particularly enjoys teaching older women who are trying to find their way back to their bodies after a sometimes very long absence.  Sorsha is thankful to have found her way to the Dharma Yoga Center and makes the trip from Vermont as often as she can.  She offers gratitude for the beautiful physical and spiritual teachings of Sri Dharma Mittra.



Ten Tips for New Teachers…

by Jason Zagaro


As you grow as a yoga teacher, you realize there is a lot more happening during a “typical” class than you may have first realized.  



When I first began teaching, my main concerns were: (1) avoiding injuries and (2) timing – how in the world was I going to fill 75 minutes? 

Time is usually something that consumes the mind of a novice teacher  – we think too much and too fast, speak too fast, move too fast…  



Patience is a virtue as a teacher and it gets developed over time. You cannot please everyone in class. Stay true to yourself; be creative but don’t stray too far from your wheelhouse. Eventually your composure, personality, structure and experience will take over as a teacher.  



The following are ten teaching tips that I have discovered over the years of being a yoga instructor:

1. Keep it simple. 
Don’t try and be the best yoga teacher on the planet and remember everything they taught you in your training. If Sanskrit words come naturally and you feel comfortable using them, then do so. Otherwise, work on filling your time and watching the room so people don’t get injured. 



2. Decide what level of preparation is your preferred method. 
Some teachers have no idea what pose is coming next. Some teachers have the class scripted to the T. Some even sequence the entire class set to the music they play. Many teachers just teach on a whim, spontaneously reacting to who is in the room. A good teacher teaches to the level of the room.



 3. Bad music is more of a factor than good music.
If the music is “bad” or inappropriate for a yoga class, it can really dampen or ruin the class. Everybody remembers a teacher who plays awful music and it can even deter the students from going back to that class. My first teacher in college had one CD and for three years he played the same CD in every class. The CD was Krishna Das’ Pilgrim Heart, which was my first introduction to kirtan. I remember my first year training with him and I thought, “This music is awful!” After constantly hearing the same songs over and over, my frame of mind finally adjusted and I began to like the CD. If I hear Pilgrim Heart being played in a yoga studio now, I get flashbacks to that time in my life. Some lineages of yoga don’t have music at all; they want you to work on calming the mind, which means no distractions from your asana class.  



4. Be grateful to your students for coming to class.
I am always grateful to everyone who comes to take my class, even if some don’t follow the code of asana class perfectly. The fact that people would pay their hard earned money, drive to the studio, part from their families or home life for a period of time to listen to what I have to say and be guided by me as a teacher really makes me feel grateful.  



5. Set the guidelines for conduct in your classes.
As teachers, we are trained, and most of us practice, patience and understanding. We understand no one is perfect– including ourselves as yoga teachers! Nonetheless, it is our responsibility to set the code of conduct for the class. Some teachers will tell me about students not acting appropriately and I always ask them if they discussed the problem with the student. Sometimes students are not being disrespectful, it is that they just don’t know the parameters of the class.  It is our job as teachers to educate them.  




6. Encourage Your Students to Practice Away from Class.

As teachers, we have instincts that grow over time. We can usually tell who has a solid home practice.  



 7. Help you students overcome their fears.
If your students have a lot of fears, practicing asana is a great way to work on those fears. As teachers we love to help those who are fearful about poses to overcome that fear. It is a process where we build the courage to take the first step, and then proceed from there.



8. Celebrate when a student achieves a pose.
If someone has been working on a pose and he or she finally gets it in the class, the teacher is just as excited as the student. To work so hard at something and then finally achieve that goal is such a rewarding concept.



 9. Pay some, but not too much, attention to your numbers.
As yoga teachers we care about bringing people to our classes and pleasing the owner of the studio where we are teaching. Numbers are not important in the concept of yoga, but revenue is part of the reality of teaching yoga today.



10. Don’t forget to take a moment to appreciate it all.
In the end, you’ve created a peaceful environment for the students and introduced the beauty of yoga and watched it transform lives. When the class is moving as one, as one heartbeat, and the students are moving in sync, take a moment to stand back and experience the gratitude of being a part of the peaceful unity that is occurring during the class. 

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Jason Zagaro graduated from the 500-Hour Dharma Yoga Life of a Yogi Teacher Training in March 2013. He’s been studying Yoga tradition and philosophy for over eighteen years. Yoga has been the most wonderful experience that he has ever come across in his life. He started his training in 1995 with Ashtanga Yoga at the college that he attended, and later began to study and practice various forms of Hatha Yoga, Kripalu Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga, Integral Yoga and decided to become a certified Sivananda Yoga Teacher. 


~Teacher Profile of the Month~


Andrew Jones

Andrew teaches an open Dharma I-II class every Tuesday night (7-8:30 PM), Dharma I Basics(4-week course: Mondays, 7-8:30 PM), and Dharma II Basics (4-week course: Wednesdays, 7-8:30 PM) at DYNYC.
1.    Where were you born?
AJ: Swansea, Wales, UK… Or “England”, as people like to call it here.
2.  What do you do when you don’t teach yoga?
AJ: Try and bring the practice to the workplace, and spread some of the love in this very stressful world of many ups and downs. I like to introduce others to yoga and show them how it may help their everyday lives & bring a smile to their faces – these are small steps that can build into huge gains for all!
3.  Three things you always have in your fridge?
AJ: Bananas, soy milk, sprouted almonds
4.  Favorite veggie restaurant in the area?
AJ: Natural Frontier – they have the best juices, especially green ones. Plus they look after Dharma Yogis with much love!
5.  One practice you must do every day?
AJ: Compassion to all beings with love.
 
The first thing you notice about Andrew Jones is his joyfully lighthearted nature. Though he takes his practice seriously, he is a bit of a jokester. Some might assume, because of Andrew’s seemingly constant smile, that he is a full-time yogi – devoting hours and hours to his sadhana, or practice, every single day. While he is a full-time yogi, it’s not necessarily in the way you’d imagine: his sadhanais the practice of daily life – of bringing “yoga” with him wherever he goes, even the world of corporate advertising!
Like so many of us, Andrew began practicing yoga because of hardships in various areas of his life (including scoliosis and knee problems) He enrolled in our teacher training program because another teacher at the DYNYC told him it would be a great spiritual experience. Though he did not set out initially with the goal of teaching, he connects greatly with the intention of helping to uplift his students: “It’s great to see people leave feeling good – even if it only lasts a little while, at least they’ve tasted the benefits.”
He is extremely devoted to Sri Dharma Mittra and his teachings; he speaks with great admiration about Sri Dharma’s compassion, unconditional love, and playfulness that are apparent in every single class; in taking Andrew’s class, it is clear that he strives to bring these attributes into his own life and teaching as well.

Author/interviewer: Danielle Gray, Online Media Manager at DYNYC

~Teacher Profile of the Month~


Yoshio Hama

Yoshio teachesthe Master Sadhana on Fridays 
(12 – 2 PM), 
Maha Shakti on Friday nights (6:30 – 8 PM), and Dharma IV every Sunday (12 – 1:30 PM) at DYNYC.
1.    Where were you born?
YH: Caracas, Venezuela
2.  Describe yourself in three words.
YH: Quiet, calm, peaceful
3.  What do you do when you don’t teach yoga?
YH: Spend time and share with my lovely wife and daughter
4.  Four things you always have in your fridge?
YH: Oranges, spinach, raisins, and tahini
5.  One practice you must do every day?
YH: Patience and compassion
  
Yoshio is one of Dharma Yoga NYC’s best-kept secrets. As a teacher, Yoshio has a great gift for showing students how to easily get to the next step from exactly where they are, as well as an air of kindhearted devotion (very much similar to Sri Dharma). In watching his demonstrations of advanced postures, you would never guess that he started practicing yoga because he suffered from extreme pain due to scoliosis. He is living proof that a mindful and consistent yoga practice can truly heal a person!
Being able to help other people is what inspires Yoshio most. He strives to always be of service – to give what he can to those who are receptive (and believe us, it’s easy to be receptive to his gentle, unassuming presence). Yoshio does not actively promote himself as a teacher; he wants the students to have found his class because they all have something to learn from each other.
Yoshio was also recently “sleuthed” – check out the beautiful article here.


Author/interviewer: Danielle Gray, Online Media Manager at DYNYC

Life of a Yogi Graduation Satsang, October 2012


Twice a year, the Life of a Yogi Teacher Training team gathers together to honor the trainees who have completed all their requirements to become certified Dharma Yoga Instructors. Sri Dharma himself presents the certificates, and friends and family are always invited! Below you’ll find a collection of photos from the recent graduation in October, and some reflections from five of our 200-hour graduates (Kelsey Tangel, Amy Stinchcombe, Elaine Kantanas, Sabrina Vigilante, and Mike Hazzard). All photos by Gabriela Luiz; quotes attributed following each image. 

(MH)

(SV)

(KT)

(MH)

 

…It is where I learned firmness and resolve in my practice and in the great practice of daily life. It is where I turned a corner in my life to understand in the most profound way that there is a Great Intelligence woven into the fabric of all of creation and that everything is intimately connected.
(SV)

(EK)

(AS)

(MH)

(AS)


Compiled by: Danielle Gray, Online Media Manager at DYNYC