Category Archives: salad

Yogi Favorites: Carrot Raisin Salad

Recipe:
2 tbs. sun-dried raisins
2 carrots
1 tbs. lemon juice or juice of half a lemon
5 tsp. raw honey, date, or brown rice syrup
2 tbs. cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil

This deceivingly light and simple recipe is an excellent dish for an antioxidant boost. Every single one of the ingredients in the Carrot Raisin Salad contains various forms of phenolic compounds that work to alleviate oxidative stress and cell aging. Phenolic compounds are characterized by a broad spectrum of beneficial antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antimutagenic, and anti-inflammatory properties.

Besides increasing antioxidant activity, fresh squeezed lemon juice also adds vibrant Vitamin C, while high levels of monounsaturated fat in olive oil reduces inflammation, cholesterol, and blood pressure. Meanwhile, the natural sugar content in dates and honey make them great natural energy boosters. Dates are high in dietary fiber and rich in tannins, a type of flavanoid polyphenolic antioxidant, while honey’s anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal properties have been used throughout history to treat everything from respiratory problems to open wounds.

With all the superfoods in this dish, it’s hard to pin down one superstar, but among all the sources of Vitamin A, carrots boast the highest levels, making them an essential for benefits such as good eye health and clean skin. They also a great digestive aid, as they help cleanse the intestines, liver, and colon of ulcer and cancer-causing toxins.

Raisins are lower in phenolic content than raw red grapes, but still a great source of quercetin, the type of polyphenols found in this particular fruit. It is recommended to use dark raisins for flavor and also because they are available sun-dried, whereas golden raisins must be treated with sulfur dioxide to prevent oxidation and caramelization.

For an interesting variation of this salad, try steaming the carrots lightly.

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Text: Lana J. Lee  Picture: Marta Simonetti

Recipe Source: The Dharma Yoga LOAY Teacher Training Manual

Yogi Favorites: Spinach Salad

Since the Popeye days, spinach has always been associated with iron and great energy and strength. We now know that this was due to an accidental but significant misplacement of a decimal point when German scientist Emil von Wolff was measuring iron levels in spinach in 1870 (this date was eventually corrected in 1937 – but by that time the myth had already taken hold).

Additionally, iron from plant sources are rich in non-heme iron, as opposed to heme iron found in animal sources. Non-heme iron is not as readily absorbed by the body, but Vitamin C can help increase levels of uptake so adding the lemon in this salad is truly essential.

Sun-dried and raw tomatoes are also both rich sources of Vitamin C, and together with lemon, they boost spinach’s nutritional power and add great benefits of their own.

Mushrooms are low in calories and  sodium, yet they provide important nutrients including selenium, potassium, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin D and more.

Spinach_Salad_@Marta_Simonetti2

 

Recipe:

-1 large bunch of spinach
-1 cup sun-dried tomatoes
-4 oz. chopped mushrooms
-Sea salt to taste
-1 squeezed lemon
-1 tsp. cumin (optional)
-Olive or flax oil (optional)
-Chopped avocado and tomato (optional)

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Add the tomatoes and mushrooms to the spinach and toss. Add the dressing and toss to combine. Serve immediately and enjoy!

Recipe Source: The Dharma Yoga LOAY Teacher Training Manual

Yogi Favorites (4) Dharma Salad

Avocados and tomatoes are both superfood fruits in their own right, but together they make a true power couple! 
 
The Dharma Salad is a great example of how good food combining can provide even more nutritional benefits. Tomatoes contain the antioxidant lycopene, which is better absorbed by the body when consumed with fatty foods like avocados. Lycopene is a pigment-rich nutrient from the carotenoid family that gives tomatoes, among other fruits and vegetables, their red hue. Studies have shown this powerful antioxidant’s potential to reduce risks of cancer and cardiovascular disease. 

For the purest benefits, try to purchase organic and locally grown tomatoes. 

Here’s how to do it:

Cut one avocado into cubes.
 

 

Slice two large tomatoes.

 

Mix a splash of cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil with a splash of Bragg’s liquid aminos or sea salt. Add the sprouts (any kind). Stir all ingredients together and enjoy!  (Serves 1-2)

Text: Lana J. Lee Pictures: Cayla Carapella & Enid Johnstone
Recipe Source and Sprouting Instructions: The Dharma Yoga LOAY Teacher Training Manual